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Bringing the Reality of Sexual Addiction to Light

Parent: “I just enrolled Max in a rehabilitation program.”

Friend: “I had no idea he had an alcohol or drug problem?”

Parent:  “He doesn’t…”

The words this parent hesitates to say, do not come easily.

How do you tell someone that your son has a sexual addiction?  How do you admit that you fear that he may harm someone else or himself in attempts to act out the fictional scenes he has become addicted to watching online?

Enrolling your child in a rehabilitation center is never an easy decision, regardless of the reason, but to do so because of sexual addiction inherently carries with it a heavy stigma.  No one is surprised that teenagers view pornography…it is everywhere and easily accessible.

However, when you start to talk about pornography as an addiction or a serious problem, many times your concerns are either dismissed or you are accused of moralizing a natural curiosity.  But when sexual addiction inhibits a teens ability to function normally or to relate to people in healthy ways, as parents, we cannot remain naive to reality.

Would it be easier to remain in denial…to tell ourselves that it is just a stage…that it won’t affect him? Sure, but we would be swallowing a lie.

What our culture tells us is a harmless, dirty little secret, has become an breeding ground for addiction, shame, loneliness, and violent sexual behaviors of epidemic proportions.

Here are some of the facts:

-As of 2008, 87% of young men & 31 % of young women report using pornography (Carroll, 2008).

-“…pornography tricks your brain into releasing the same pleasure chemicals that drugs do. What’s more is your brain actually begins to rewire itself because of this artificial stimulation” (Fight the New Drug, 2014)

-One study found that 88.2% of pornography contained physically aggression & 48.7% of scenes contained verbal aggression (Juniper, 2010)

-Young people who viewed aggressive or violent sexual material were found to be six times more likely to report forcing someone online or in person into sexual acts (Center of Disease & Control, 2010)

Pornographic and sexual addictions are very real and extremely destructive.  What’s worse is that there seems to be an endless supply of pornography being marketed on every computer, mobile, or cellular device.  Parents are struggling to stay ahead of their teens technical “know how” in order to shield them from exposure to these materials.

At Teen Challenge, we are seeing an influx of admissions inquiries from parents who are struggling to help their sons who are in the grips of this new drug of teen sexual addiction.  The first step you can take towards helping your son or daughter is to acknowledge the problem, research ways to safeguard them from access, and start to educate them about the truth behind sexual addictions and pornography.  Bring the truth to light!

As a Christian organization, we have always known the destructive truth about pornography and have stood on the front lines helping young men battle this temptation.  We also take hope and great encouragement from God’s word in 1 Corinithians 10:13…”No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your ability, but with the temptation he will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it.”

Ozarks Teen Challenge strives to be an environment that God can use as a “way of escape” for those struggling with any type of addiction.  A place to break away from their drug of choice, to learn the truth about how God created them, and to be empowered by the strength and faithfulness of God.

If your teen is caught in the grips of sexual addiction, call us today to see how we can help!  417-272-3784. For Admission Inquiries Click Here

For more statistics go to: http://www.internetsafety101.org/pornographystatistics.htm

For more information about the effects of pornography to go: http://fightthenewdrug.org/

If you’re a parent who is looking for more information about how to handle teen drug abuse then check out our article here

 

Citations:

Carroll, Jason S., et al. “Generation XXX: Pornography Acceptance and Use Among Emerging Adults.  Journal of Adolescent Research 23.1 (2008) 6-30. (Study examined population of emerging adults, aged 18-26)

Juniper Research, “Videochat and subscription services to drive mobile adult revenues to $2.8bn by 2015, Juniper Report finds,” Oct. 14, 2010.  http://www.juniperresearch.com/viewpressrelease.php?pr=210

Fight the New Drug, “Porn is Like a Drug,” Aug, 8th 2014.  http://fightthenewdrug.org/porn-is-like-a-drug/#sthash.mpoRL5fv.dpbs

Internet Solutions for Kids, Center for Disease & Control, November, 2010

 

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